Transgender Day of Visibility offers succes stories

Rachel Quy, (right), an MSU Denver student, and her friend Stephanie Sharky attended MSU Denver’s Transgender Day of Visibility, to show their support for the transgender community. Photo by Katie Avery

Rachel Quy, (right), an MSU Denver student, and
her friend Stephanie Sharky attended MSU Denver’s
Transgender Day of Visibility, to show their
support for the transgender community. Photo by Katie Avery

MSU Denver’s Transgender Day of Visibility helped to show that the GLBT community is growing larger and gaining more support than ever before.

On April 3, in Sigi’s Cabaret in the Tivoli, writer, counselor, and MSU Denver psychology graduate Jennifer Blair shared the story of how she became a happy, successful transgender woman. Blair kicked off her message by talking about the transition from male to female. She described it as “being in a box, a social construction that society puts us in.”

Blair said it was difficult to  find happiness before her transition because she could not be her true self. She worked as a car salesman for a while and was optimistic about early retirement. Ready for a change, she quit her job, took on her new identity as “Jennifer” and enrolled at MSU Denver.

“There were were so many hands that helped lift me up, I found my bliss,” Blair said.

Blair strives to be a positive role model and advocate for the GLBT community and opened her own private counseling practice in 2005.

Attendees also heard the transgender success story of Jan Scott Frasier. She was previously a successful animation director in Japan. After growing unhappy with life as a man, Frasier decided to make her transition at the age of 35.

A storyteller and world traveler, she said animation is still a passion of hers. For now, she is focusing on counseling individuals in the GLBT community and is hoping to open up a private practice in the future.

Rachel Quy, an MSU Denver student, said she had no expectations about the event, but found it to be informative.

“It was good to see people show up,” she said. “What we all want is not just acceptance, but growth. I want people to know I’m just like everyone else: I’m normal, I’m a dork, I like Star Wars and I’m also trans.”

Quy’s friend and fellow attendee Stephanie Sharky, said she felt that education about transgender people was a positive step.

“We live in a world where a large population in the trans community commits suicide,” Sharky said. “Educating the general public would definitely create compassion and bring an understanding to what it means to be transgender, what the experience is. It definitely isn’t an easy one.”

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